Week of April 18th in Reception

I was genuinely looking forward to seeing the children again this week, and they didn’t disappoint! Only a short week, but they packed a lot in.  The new trampoline was a big hit out in the garden, as was the new pizza role play. We need to blag some Domino pizza boxes, different sizes. Please also send in any photos of the children eating pizza. We heard lots of language of size, cost, time to cook and delivery times. The children then began making their own collage pizzas and pizza play dough, one white batch for the dough a second batch for the red tomato base which led to discussion about what they like to put on their own pizzas. Then the children wanted to make a real pizza together in class. The children are going to  order the ingredients online next week ‘like mummy does, …and a man delivers it.’

Getting a bit of maths into the trampoline work out:

We began reading the story of Jack and the Beanstalk and will also look at different versions or adaptations over the term. The children enjoyed exploring the magic beans, which led to some lovely sorting and counting then looking at capacity.

We observed the children trying to write their own stories.  This term we are encouraging the children to write in sentences, so please support this at home with the phonic sounds that they are learning in class.

 

In PE his week we practised team work and ball skills. Great fun, roll on Sports Day!

Save the date: June 20th Reception and Nursery are doing Sport day together.

Next Week:

We will be learning about St. George, and the Queen’s birthday.

  • We are collecting kitchen roll cardboard centres for castle turrets in junk modelling to go with St. George’s Day.
  • We are always collecting milk bottle tops.

We will be planting ‘magic’ beans to go with Jack’s beanstalk

We will be ordering food online and following the delivery process to then make pizza. Then eating it!

Take a photo of your child eating pizza and send it in.

 

Housekeeping:

We do enjoy getting email observations of home learning, keep them coming.

Keep encouraging reading and writing at home. More children are starting their second Teddy word book.

Please ensure all uniform is labelled with YOUR child’s name on it and that all children have  a PE kit and outdoor trainers.

 

Mrs. Quinn

 

 

 

 

Play Dough

The properties of play dough and other malleable materials make it fun for investigation and exploration as well as secretly building up strength in all the tiny hand muscles and tendons, making them ready for pencil and scissor control later on.

Squeeze and squish it
Roll it into small balls
Rolling pins to flatten it
Manipulating to create a representation of our world.

 

 

Poking in objects and pulling them out of play dough strengthens hand muscles and eye co-ordination. Tactile play
encourages children to e squash, squeeze, roll, flatten, chop, cut, score it, poke it! Each one of these different actions aids fine motor development in a different way, not to mention hand-eye co-ordination and general concentration.

Imagination and Creativity:

Adding open ended play items to add to the mix, play dough develops imaginative play and children can represent their world/ A jar of candles and cupcakes cases leads naturally to birthday party role-play, counting out candles and singing! Children  can make chocolates and sweets in a sweet shop, cakes and bread in a bakery, faces, creatures, animals. The list is as endless as a child’s imagination!

Calming and soothing:

As any adult who has played with dough can tell you, the effects of all that squeezing and pummeling are great for stress relief and can feel extremely therapeutic! Little children can struggle to express their emotions and using dough while talking and singing can really help that process.

Science and Discovery:

The actual act of making the play dough can lead to lots of questioning and prediction skills. Here we have some solid materials (flour, salt etc) to which we are going to add some liquids (oil, water.) What do you think will happen? What can we make? The child gets to explore and observe the changing state of materials in a hands-on way, and be filled with wonder as the bowl of unrelated ingredients comes together to form a sticky then smooth and squishy ball of dough! We often take these things for granted, but in the eyes and hands of a child that’s quite some transformation!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maths and Literacy Opportunities:

In more focused play, play dough can be used as a fantastic way to practise letter and number work. Children can  spell out their own name, make numbers, form shapes, compare lengths/ thicknesses/ weights, count out rolled balls to match numeral cards, match and sort by colour and SO many more ideas too!

Following a recipe and instructions, counting out cups, measuring out ingredients, measuring time in the microwave, portioning out the dough amongst friends, are all meaningful and important experiences too!

 

 

 

Literacy: Reading and Writing

Literacy development involves encouraging children to link sounds and letters and to begin to read and write. Children must be given access to a wide range of reading materials (books, poems, and other written materials) to ignite their interest.

In Early Years we will be working towards children developing their:

  • Reading skills: by the end of reception children will read and understand simple sentences. They will use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately. They also read some common irregular words. They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.
  • Writing: by the end of reception children will use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds. They also write some irregular common words. They write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly and others are phonetically plausible.

How can you help?

  • The most effective way to help a child to learn to read is simply to read aloud to them regularly and often.
  • The learning of nursery rhymes helps them to notice the sounds in words and the tunes help them to remember the words.
  • Read stories regularly to your child, they will want to hear their favourites over and over again and will soon know them off by heart, reprimanding you if you miss out parts or change the order!
  • The books that are best are books your children like! You will soon discover which they are!
  • Join your local library, it is free and a wonderful source of good quality literature!
  • Before they can learn to write children must learn to control a pencil and form the shapes they want, so don’t try to teach your child to write letters until they have had lots of drawing experience.
  • Free drawing enables them to explore shapes, gain confidence and develop the right muscles for writing. Your child will start by making marks that look like scribble. This is a very important first stage to develop good pencil grip and control. The children will enjoy working with a variety of implements – pencils, crayons, chalks, felt-tips, paints, etc. Show them how to hold a pencil correctly.
  • Show them how to hold a pencil correctly.
  • Gradually your child will start to draw shapes that look more like letters, often starting with the letters in their own name. If your child is showing an interest in writing letters use a capital letter for the start of their name and then lower case letters for the rest of their name.
  • Make sure your child sees you writing, so that they know writing has a purpose.
  • Get them to take a short shopping list to the shops with you and cross off the items as you put them in the basket.
  • Encourage your child to do their own emergent writing. They may start by writing initial and dominant sounds from the words; this is normal, praise all of their efforts and be very proud of your child
  • If your child is left-handed don’t do anything to alter this. It really doesn’t matter and it’s wrong to force a child to change.

Finally: Attend the phonics talk in the Autumn term, pheck out the Phonics blog and knock on Mrs. Quinn’s, or your class teachers door, with any questions or concerns.

Check out the core reading texts recommended for your child.